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Disruptors: Kings List



Black fathers are important to our community. Unfortunately, the media paints a negative picture of Black fathers. The stereotype that follows these men affects their mental health and their ability to learn how to evolve into who their children need them to be. In the past, positive examples of Black Fatherhood came far and few between. But, In fact, statistics show that single Black fathers have grown since the 1990s.



These four Kings represent what it means to set an example of the positivity of Black Fatherhood. These men know the power they have to influence their bloodline for years to come and they have made it their mission to support other Black fathers. Vulnerability and the willingness to be honest about their struggles show their bravery in a world that does its best to show that they do not exist.


Sean Williams

Co-Founder of The Dad Gang


Photo courtesy of Sean Williams

At what point did you want to advocate for Black fathers?


I became an advocate for Black fathers in 2016 after a brief encounter with a stranger who was shocked to see how active and involved I was with raising my children.


What does fatherhood mean to you?


With the understanding that once I became a dad I was now a teacher, protector, provider, etc., and the first example of what a man is to my children. Fatherhood literally changed the way I approached and lived my life.


What legacy would you like to leave behind?


I was the first in my family to break a lot of generational curses as it relates to fatherhood and the way I bonded with my children. I've set them up by pouring so much love and attention into my children that I know they'll emulate most of the things I've done when they start families of their own. I believe that family is everything so I made it a point to give and do everything for my family in hopes that they'll do the same.


What do you enjoy most about being a father?


Being a father is one of the most rewarding and fun experiences I've ever had. What I love the most is reliving through my children's new experiences. I like to call it my second childhood.


James Oliver, Jr.

Photo courtesy of James Oliver Jr.

At what point did you want to advocate for Black fathers?


Since I've been a dad of twins in 2013.


What does Fatherhood mean to you?


It means I have a responsibility to leave a legacy of mental and financial wealth for my kids and grandkids.


What do you enjoy most about being a father?


It's connected me to my purpose.


Jamal Pedro

Founder of PROJECTCRY

Photo Credit: Instagram: l0verebel

At what point did you want to advocate for Black fathers?


When I realized that I learned to become a father by the absence of mine. Never sure if I was doing this right but realized how important it was for me to be there.


What does Fatherhood mean to you?


It means I have the opportunity to raise not just a woman or man, but a human being. Someone with a soul, with a spirit. All parts of me go into that. Softness and all.


What legacy would you like to leave behind?


I would like to leave behind a legacy of creativity, vulnerability and lightness. My daughter and I have a beautiful and light relationship. I was never too tough to get my hair and makeup done just for her to smile.

What do you enjoy most about being a father?


One of the most enjoyable parts of being a father is connecting to my inner child. The playing, the curiosity, the innocence and growth. It’s an amazing journey.


David Jamison II

Teacher at Hickory Ridge Elementary School


Photo Credit: ​​FreemanPhotography

At what point did you want to advocate for Black fathers?


When I realized that Black fathers are often undervalued. We are not celebrated enough.


What does fatherhood mean to you?


Fatherhood means laying down your life so that others can live through you. Creating a legacy that a child can benefit from later in life.


What legacy would you like to leave behind?


I want people to see that the foundation to success is through love in human interaction. I would also want to leave behind a school that prepares students for life, not just to pass a test.

What do you enjoy most about being a father?


I get to see the younger version of myself again. I also get to help maximize the fullest potential of my younger self by giving my son everything that I needed growing up.


Check out our Family Issue.



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