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Wayne A. Jones Is The First Black Police Chief Of Miami Beach

The first Black police chief in the city of Miami Beach was sworn in late August.


Wayne A. Jones was sworn in as the new Chief of the Miami Beach Police Department in a special ceremony at the New World Center surrounded by family, friends, law enforcement and elected leaders. He raised his right hand and took the oath of office administered by Mayor Dan Gelber, according to CBSNews.

"Today I am humbled to stand before you as the first black police chief in one of America's most iconic cities. I actually tell people this is the coolest city in America," Chief Jones said.


Serving on the department for 27 years, he started out on patrol and eventually moved up the ranks, leading a task force investigating human trafficking.


"In every job he's had, he's performed in an extraordinary fashion," Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber said. "It is that body of work that brings him here today to be our chief."


Elected officials showed Chief Jones with endless love and praise, including a letter of support from President Joe Biden.


Congresswoman Frederica Wilson and State Senator Shevrin Jones, among others, presented Chief Jones with various awards and accolades.


Jones’ family was in attendance, and his father pinned him with his new badge, which is a full-circle moment for the two men.


"My father, who I'm honored is here today to share this special moment with me, to see me become the Police Chief of the department he once warned me about when I was a teenager learning to drive here in South Florida."


Born in the Bahamas, Chief Jones moved to South Florida and earned an Associate of Science degree in Aviation from Miami-Dade College, as well as a dual Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration and Political Science from Florida Memorial University. Additionally, he earned a graduate degree in Public Administration from Florida International University.


Most recently, he was the Deputy Chief in Miami Beach, a city where Black folks are less than 5% of the population.


"Black Bahamian hands built this city," said Glendon Hall, the Chair of the Miami Beach Black Affairs Advisory Committee. "Black culture made Miami Beach cool, from Ella Fitzgerald to Prince. Don't let anybody ever tell you, you don't belong here."


In his speech, he promised to address Spring Break chaos issues as well as increasing diversity in the department through mentorship and training.

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