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Author Mario Reyes Helps Strengthen the Bond Between Fathers and Sons

One renaissance man delved into what it took to pursue his dreams, impact people in a positive light, and to do what is right in the world.



An information technology professional, writer, poet, businessman, keynote speaker and former military honoree, Bronx native Mario Reyes revealed what it took to become a writer, mastering masculinity as well as fatherhood in an interview with The Quintessential Gentleman.



Reyes had humble beginnings. In the interview, he revealed that he was inspired to write a book based on the barber that he went to in Baltimore. He said his barber would cut six children in a row, and when the cut was done looking sharp and fresh, the barber imparted lessons to each kid. Reyes said the barber did that because each kid was dropped off by their mom and the father was normally not in their life, either dead or in jail.


Already wanting to write and in a poetic element because of being passionate about rapping, Reyes went on to write a book, A Son With No Father, A Book With No Author, which centers on educating children – and parents -- on specific lessons. A workbook would then be attached to it.



He also has a nonprofit entitled Manifest Destiny that brings fathers and sons together, highlighting the lessons and chapters in the book and the workbook. The workshop has a weekly course and an eight-week course, which goes over topics from the book; manhood, family, school and bullying among other pertinent topics.


Reyes was able to help so many fathers and sons because he had a strong family upbringing. He said his father was a stern pastor and teacher of lessons from Puerto Rico, while his mother was more on the liberal side.


“He gave me all that he knew,” Reyes said. “When we stand on the shoulders of giants, it’s not for us to criticize what they gave you or what they failed to because they only did the best that they knew how. It’s on me to stir the pot a little. … It’s on me to build on what he gave me. My dad was dope.”


Later in the interview, Reyes speaks on other topics of his book, including masculinity and the age of social media. Reyes, who has been working in information technology and has been fond of the internet since 1999, said that he taught his son and daughter that the internet is forever. But folk’s attention spans aren’t.



“You might be the talk of the town on Tuesday, but by Tuesday afternoon, nobody will remember because somebody else will be the talk of the town. The turnaround is fast. The attrition rate is so high on embarrassment. Don’t worry about it, just write it out. Crack jokes on yourself.”


And lastly, Reyes said the most elemental advice he can give when it comes to parental advice is to enjoy every second of it, and to learn with your children.


Check out the full interview below.



Photo Credit: Blair Devereaux

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