House Passes the Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act


The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act on Monday, July 27. Introduced by Frederica S. Wilson, the act will establish a 19-member commission examining the social disparities that disproportionately affect Black males in America.



“I am elated that this legislation, which I have been fighting for several years to pass, is now poised to become national law,” Wilson said. “The commission will review police brutality, gun violence, fatherhood, recruiting and training Black male teachers, and even sneakers, which play an important role in the lives of black boys. Welfare reform and the 1994 crime bill, which includes the controversial three strikes provision and harsh sentencing guidelines, also will be revisited.”


The Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act establishes a permanent, bipartisan commission within the United States Commission on Civil Rights. Its 19 members will include congressional lawmakers, executive branch appointees, issue experts, activists, and other stakeholders who will examine social disparities affecting Black men and boys in America.


“These federal policies left a devastating impact on Black men and boys in America. The commission’s underlying goal is to interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline and to better understand and eventually eliminate the educational and social chasms that have made it extraordinarily difficult for black males to become upwardly mobile,” Wilson said.